Conventional verus Synthetic oil

by Todd
(Minot, ND)

2006 Vulcan

2006 Vulcan

2006 Vulcan
2053cc Vulcan
2007 Yamaha R1

After initial break in period (first two oil changes or 1,000 miles), using top shelf conventional oils, I switched to synthetic.


I found the shifting to be better (less noise for sure), and less burn off during hard riding.

I ride a 2006 2053cc Vulcan, 2007 Yamaha R1, and my wife is on a 2005 Suzuki 800c. I ride at least 6k miles per year.

I'm happy with good conventional oil, but given the choice I will use quality synthetic oil, after the break in period.

Comments for Conventional verus Synthetic oil

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Jul 29, 2011
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myself
by: Anonymous

I use synthetic in the engine and regular in the tranny with great results. The engine seems looser for a lack of better words and runs great . 07 street glide

Jun 04, 2011
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Part 3
by: Dickfer

So, buy the correct oil only for motorcycles right? NOPE! For those of you who have a older bike and who want to save some money. Go to Wal-Mart and buy Motor Oil for Diesels. Because Wal-Mart caters to Truckers, and those big diesels need that Zink and Magnesium, you can save yourself a TON of money and run with a Synthetic oil for half the price.
Okay, now Synthetic VS Conventional. A long time ago, Synthetics where just starting out, and they did cause seals to be destroyed and rubber gaskets to break down etc. Now a days that is not the case.
You get more wear on your engine during STARTING and STOPPING then when it is running. The big advantage synthetic oil has over conventional oil is that of carbon base. Carbon will bond with conventional oil and as such, will cause it to get dirty FAST, and also, will cause that carbon to bond with the wax basically they put in oil, and that then bonds to ANY surface that is not moving. Ever pull apart a old engine and see the sludge buildup? That is conventional oil, the wax (paraffin) and carbon. Pull apart a motor that has been running on synthetic oil and you will not find that, because it does not use Paraffin and the carbon floats in the oil and never really gets a chance to bond with the oil.
Synthetics have another advantage, if you take to flat surfaces of metal and put conventional oil on one, and synthetic on the other. Add lets say 20 lbs to the top and then walk away for a year. When you pull the two apart, the conventional oil will seep out! The synthetic will bond to the metal and stay! (run synthetic in like your lawnmower, in some cases, you might not use it for MONTHS, and when you do, you want oil on those bearing surfaces)
Now, auto and motorcycle manufactures sell their products all over the world, so they need to make sure the engine will last, or work until the warranty expires. So they tell everyone to use a Multi-grade oil. 5W-30 etc.

Part 3

Jun 04, 2011
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Part 2
by: Dickfer

Okay, back to bikes. So back in 1975 they came out with this catalytic converter and introduced them to American cars, one of the first things that happened was they noticed that the catalytic converters where clogging up and people started to complain. At first people thought it was from Leaded gasoline but what it came from is the Zink and the Magnesium used in MOTOR OIL!
When motor oil first came out they tried to make it good for all applications and they found out that using Zink and Magnesium in the oil, helped reduce the metal to metal contact that happens. Problem is that it “Off Gasses” and that is picked up when burnt, (leaky valve stems, Piston rings etc.) so that off gases now when burnt by the catalytic converter started to bond to the surfaces of the cat and cause the catalytic converter to basically melt down or clog up all the way.
So they first did away with the amount of Zink and Magnesium they put in the oil or I should say they reduced it. Then they did away with Unleaded gasoline and that is where we are at today.
Now, if you have a Harley that the engine oil is NOT shared with the Transmission oil, then regular motor oil can be used. BUT, if your bike is made that the Engine Oil is SHARED with the transmission oil, then you need to buy MOTORCYCLE oil. Motorcycle Oil has that Zink and Magnesium added to it! Transmissions have gears that are slamming together or grinding, that Zink and Magnesium takes that pounding and it reduces it to a more acceptable level.

Part 2

Mar 18, 2011
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Oils
by: Valkboy

I have heard that not all synthetics are the same, some have addatives that may cause a wet clutch to slip...

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